How to make MPEG-4 SP

How to make an mpeg-4 Simple Profile using Adobe.  This works for Adobe Premiere and Adobe Media Encoder.

In either program, once you have your file or movie ready to go you need the settings feature.  In Premiere go to Export to see the settings.  In Encoder just click Settings.

Choose the MPEG4 format (not h.264) and then under Multiplexer change the setting from 3GPP to MP4.

Screen shot 2013-04-26 at 10.25.15 AM copy encoder

Under video the Profile should be set as Simple.

encoder2

That should do it.

 

 

YouTube upload troubleshooting

When I want to upload a video to youtube I simply click the “upload” button at the top of the page (after I’ve signed in of course) and then click “upload video”. Simple. So let’s go over the problems.

On certain browsers, if your upload failed, all the information you typed in as you waited for the video to be uplaoded will be lost. There’s no trying to re-upload into the same information you’ve just spent time typing up.

So now that you’re upload has failed ( I got “Failed (unable to convert video file)”, you might want to start with, “Well, maybe there was something wrong with my file? Perhaps it was the wrong format or something?” It’s not as easy as it should be to find the parameters for uploading into youtube acceptably.  I tried the obvious (to me) place which is the page where I initially uploaded the file. When I couldn’t find it there I got frustrated and went to Google. Here you go:

Supported YouTube file formats

File size and length

Now, my video fits into all these parameters. I just finished updating all my software that had updates, and the video still fails to upload. I turned on Private Browsing (youtube’s only other suggestion) and that failed too.

To get my video on youtube I re-exported as an mp4 using the h.264 YouTube setting on Premiere. The video finally uploaded correctly.  I’m not sure why my previous MOV 45MB 4min long video wouldn’t upload.

Premiere and the Preservation video

For the past two weeks I’ve been struggling with my export of the Preservation video from Premiere into mp4 format.  It would come  jumpy.  That’s the only way I can describe the horror that was my output mp4. And it was only mp4 because if I exported into mov or flv there was no problem. I tried a few forums, but couldn’t figure out my problem.

I made sure my export settings matched my sequence settings. I exported it multiple times on different days. I fiddled with some of the export setting options. I exported the original editing sequence and the consolidated copy.

Today, suddenly, for no reason I can figure out… it works fine. I have my mp4 and there’s no jumpiness to the video quality. I am baffled.

Xtranormal MovieMaker

I will be looking at Xtranormal MovieMaker for possible use in library tutorials.  After a quick look through the website I found out that it is possible to download the videos into an mp4 file.  We could then theoretically splice these animated video files with video screen captures of our library website. It seems like an interesting way to get the students attention.  And that’s really the most important point because if no one’s watching the videos then no one’s learning what you intended. Might as well just pack it up and go home.

The Xtranormal service is not free, at least not the part where you can download an mp4 file.  Also, the idea has not been fully approved. We are still in the drawing board stage.

I tried and failed to embed code from Xtranormal into WordPress so here’s the video from the YouTube page.  This video is both a good example of Xtranormal and a very informative film for anyone considering getting their PhDin the humanities:

So you Want to Get a PhD in the Humanities

The youtube page has a few more of these type of videos about getting PhD in other areas.

Export archival video file on Premiere

For archival purposes, we are following a certain format must be followed when exporting video in Premiere.  Export H.264 to mp4 and then choose the rest according to original dimensions and attributes of the original video.

For example. The Graphic Novel video was modified in export to conform with the specifications of the sequence in Premiere.

Format: H.264, Frame 1440×1080, 23.976 fps